Katherine (Kate) Quinney crocheting in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, ca. 1915. Wisconsin Historical Society WHi-70918

With the resurgence of the handmade movement and the popularization of fancywork, it’s not surprising that the work would eventually see itself featured both in film and in museums. The latest and nearby exhibit that I sadly did not get a chance to see before it closed was in Madison, Wisconsin that focused on the meaning and connection between Victorian women’s fancywork and contemporary Wisconsin craft.

History Museum at the Castle, Appleton, object #2005.005.001

Since craft is often a social event, ladies (and gents I suppose) gather to sit, work, learn and chat, it was only fitting that the James Watrous Gallery developed a community needle point project to complement the exhibit. Again, I was too little too late to contribute to the project and am sorely sad I missed the opportunity. I’ll have to keep a better eye on what’s happening in my neighbor city and keep my finger’s crossed that they do a follow-up exhibit on the finished product (they’re combining the crafted squares).

http://handmademeaning.wordpress.com/2010/11/27/theresa-schefflers-redwork-quilt/

http://handmademeaning.wordpress.com/category/community-embroidery-project/

Take a look at images from the exhibit and explore the blog. Get inspired and get going on your own fancywork.

Happy Friday!

- Colleen